Abraham de Moivre

Abraham de Moivre Abraham de Moivre (; 26 May 166727 November 1754) was a French mathematician known for de Moivre's formula, a formula that links complex numbers and trigonometry, and for his work on the normal distribution and probability theory.

He moved to England at a young age due to the religious persecution of Huguenots in France beginning in 1685. He was a friend of Isaac Newton, Edmond Halley, and James Stirling. Among his fellow Huguenot exiles in England, he was a colleague of the editor and translator Pierre des Maizeaux.

De Moivre wrote a book on probability theory, ''The Doctrine of Chances'', said to have been prized by gamblers. De Moivre first discovered Binet's formula, the closed-form expression for Fibonacci numbers linking the ''n''th power of the golden ratio ''φ'' to the ''n''th Fibonacci number. He also was the first to postulate the central limit theorem, a cornerstone of probability theory. Provided by Wikipedia
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by Moivre, Abraham de
Published 1704
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by Moivre, Abraham de.
Published 1718
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by Moivre, Abraham de
Published 1718
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by Moivre, Abraham ¬de
Published 1738
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by Moivre, Abraham de
Published 1743
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by Moivre, Abraham de
Published 1752
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by Moivre, Abraham de
Published 1752
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by Moivre, Abraham de
Published 1756
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by Newton, Isaac (1642-1727).
Published 1761
Other Authors: '; ...Moivre, Abraham de (1667-1754)...
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Published 1761
Other Authors: '; ...Moivre , Abraham de (1667-1754)...
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