Xenophon

Xenophon of Athens (; , , ''Xenophōn''; BC – 354 BC) was an Athenian historian, philosopher, and soldier. Xenophon became commander of the Ten Thousand at about 30, with noted military historian Theodore Ayrault Dodge saying of him, “the centuries since have devised nothing to surpass the genius of this warrior.” He established the precedent for many logistical operations and was among the first to use flanking maneuvers and feints. A student of Socrates, Xenophon is known for his writings and recording the history of his time (late-5th and early-4th centuries BC), in such works as ''Anabasis'' and ''Hellenica'', which covered the final seven years and the aftermath of the Peloponnesian War (431–404 BC), thus representing a thematic continuation of Thucydides' ''History of the Peloponnesian War'', and then continuing the history of Greece until the end of Sparta's hegemony around 360 BC.

As one of the Ten Thousand (Greek mercenaries), Xenophon participated in Cyrus the Younger's failed campaign to claim the Persian throne from his brother Artaxerxes II of Persia. He recounted the events in ''Anabasis'', his most notable history. Like Plato, Xenophon is an authority on Socrates, about whom he wrote several books of dialogues (the ''Memorabilia'') and an ''Apology of Socrates to the Jury'', which recounts the philosopher's trial in 399 BC.

Despite being born an Athenian citizen, Xenophon was also associated with Sparta, the traditional enemy of Athens. His pro-oligarchic politics, military service under Spartan generals in the Persian campaign and elsewhere, and his friendship with King Agesilaus II endeared Xenophon to the Spartans. Some of his works have a pro–Spartan bias, especially the royal biography ''Agesilaus'' and the ''Constitution of the Spartans''.

Xenophon's works span several genres and are written in plain-language Attic Greek, for which reason they serve as translation exercises for contemporary students of the Ancient Greek language. In the ''Lives and Opinions of Eminent Philosophers'', Diogenes Laërtius observed that, as a writer, Xenophon of Athens was known as the “Attic Muse”, for the sweetness of his diction (2.6). Provided by Wikipedia
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by Xenophon
Published 1502
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by Xenophon
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by Xénophon0430?-0355? av. J.-C
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by Xenophon
Published 1504
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by Xenophon v430-v355
Published 1505
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by Nanni, Giovanni
Published 1511
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by Maffei, Raffaele 1451-1522
Published 1511
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by Maffei, Raffaele 1451-1522
Published 1511
Other Authors: '; ...Xenophon ca. 430 v.Chr.-354 v. Chr....
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Other Authors: '; ...Xenophon ca. 430 v.Chr.-354 v. Chr....
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by Nanni, Giovanni
Published 1512
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by Nanni, Giovanni
Published 1515
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