George Amos Dorsey

George Amos Dorsey (February 6, 1868 – March 29, 1931) was an American ethnographer of indigenous peoples of the Americas, with a special focus on the Caddoan and Siouan tribes of the Great Plains. He is credited with helping develop the anthropology of the Plains Indian tribes while serving as curator at the Field Museum in Chicago from 1898 until 1915. During this period, he also was Professor of Anthropology at the University of Chicago from 1907 to 1915.

In 1897 Dorsey was one of the first anthropologists to appear as an expert forensic witness when examined what he proved were human remains and testified in the murder trial of Adolph Luetgert in Chicago. In 1925, his cultural study, ''Why We Behave Like Human Beings'', became an unexpected bestseller. This inspired the reissue of his 1917 novel, and enabled him to publish several more books on anthropology and culture. One book in preparation at the time of his death in 1931 was published posthumously. Provided by Wikipedia
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by Dorsey, George Amos 1868-1931
Published 1897
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by Dorsey, George Amos 1868-1931
Published 1898
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by Dorsey, George Amos 1868-1931
Published 1898
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by Dorsey, George Amos 1868-1931
Published 1901
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Published 1903
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by Dorsey, George Amos 1868-1931
Published 1903
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Published 1904
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by Dorsey, George Amos 1868-1931
Published 1905
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by Dorsey, George Amos 1868-1931
Published 1928
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